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SouthMach Manufacturing and Electronics Exhibition

24 - 25 May 2017

Wednesday 24th 9am-6pm
Thursday 25th 9am-4pm

Horncastle Arena Christchurch

Exhibitor Enquiry

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Exhibiting

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Industry

Education

Warehouse stationary
Work Safe New Zealand
University of Canterbury
Ford
NZ Manufacturer
Maintenance Engineering Societ
NZMEA
IEDA
Engineering News
DEMM engineering & manufacturi
Warehouse stationary
Work Safe New Zealand
University of Canterbury
Ford
NZ Manufacturer
Maintenance Engineering Societ
NZMEA
IEDA
Engineering News
DEMM engineering & manufacturi

Customisation: key component in NDA crane installation

Hamilton-based NDA Group went in search of a crane that could tackle a specific job; it needed a crane that would not only lift, but turn.

Hamilton-based NDA Group went in search of a crane that could tackle a specific job; it needed a crane that would not only lift, but turn.

Hamilton-based NDA Group went in search of a crane that could tackle a specific job; it needed a crane that would not only lift, but turn.

NDA’s core area of business is fabricating with specialty alloys and stainless steel for use in industry and when it came to construction of its stainless steel vessels the company needed not only a two hook system to lift then rotate the vessels, but also the added versatility of as much hook height as possible.

Enter Crane Hoist Lifting.

“We needed the right system that suited us and that meant that customisation was absolutely vital to suit our specific needs and facilities,” says John Smulders of NDA.

Crane Hoist Lifting installed two cranes with a capacity of six tonnes (two three-tonne hoists on each crane beam) and from that moment the focus was on the needs of the customer.

“Taking advice from Crane Hoist, we needed a twin hook system,” explains Mr Smulders,” but in the process of turning it means that the hook would not be above the lift point.”

NDA chose Street LX chain hoists instead of wire rope hoists as with a single girder crane they are more robust for rotating stainless steel vessels when compared to wire rope hoists that are susceptible to damage when the loads are not vertical.

The Street LX chain hoists have the added advantage of higher duty and good hoisting speeds when compared to standard chain hoists.

With the need also for as much hook height as possible, Mr Smulders says that Crane Hoist Lifting came to the party in terms of NDA’s specific needs.

“There was very limited headroom so it wasn’t fitted it with standard chain hoist but with a low headroom chain hoist.”

This meant that the hook could come a lot closer to the underside of the crane beam and added an additional 350mm hook height as opposed to a traditional three-tonne chain hoist.

“To add even more hook height, we then pedestaled the crane hook well above the end carriages and tapered the top of the beam to push it up even further,” explains Ian Young of Crane Hoist Lifting. “It was also necessary to fit longer end carriages to provide greater stability because of the high pedestal.

“The installation is the very latest in state of the art technology, twin hoist, rotating and lifting tanks, fully radio controlled with new generation low head room chain hoists. It’s exactly what NDA needed for the jobs they are undertaking.”

The operator can stand at the optimum position to make the lift thanks to the rubber-covered, shock-resistant SAGA-K2 industrial remote control, meaning they can position themselves safely away from the load and with optimum visibility.

The two hoists can “talk to each other” and operate in tandem or as a single hoist. Electrical limits ensure no overloading or accidental collisions (anti-collision and anti-approach technology) which meant that NDA could have two larger cranes installed than what would usually be suitable.

“Crane Hoist Lifting services both the crane and the controller and that gave us added peace of mind,” says Mr Smulders. “They met and exceeded our expectations and requirements.”

The post Customisation: key component in NDA crane installation appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Mixing it Bonfig style

Advanced technology heavy drives are being custom-engineered by Bonfiglioli in Australasia to achieve optimum cost-efficiency and reliability with clean and robust service to aerate or mix liquids.

Advanced technology heavy drives are being custom-engineered by Bonfiglioli in Australasia to achieve optimum cost-efficiency and reliability with clean and robust service to aerate or mix liquids.

Advanced technology heavy drives are being custom-engineered by Bonfiglioli in Australasia to achieve optimum cost-efficiency and reliability with clean and robust service to aerate or mix liquids.

Bonfiglioli’s HDP parallel shaft helical gear drives are an outstanding new generation of large industrial gearbox assembled in Australasia to produce exceptional reliability and torque densities to record values, says the managing director, Bonfiglioli Transmission (Australia) Pty Ltd, Malcolm Lewis.

The drives feature excellent torque distribution across their entire ratio range, with gear ratios laid out in close progression and the drives having a rugged capacity to cope with the shock and impact of intermittent loads.

The full range of Bonfiglioli large parallel shaft gearboxes has been extended for the Australian marketplace, with output torque ranging from 4720Nm to 215480Nm. Bonfiglioli’s HDP range features a housing made from spheroidal cast iron; monobloc from HDP60 to HDP120 and horizontally split HDP130 to HDP160.

Bonfiglioli’s Drives Service Centre (DSC) enables Bonfiglioli to respond rapidly to local industry’s needs for drives required for prompt delivery to avoid costly delay or downtime.

Reliability in service is enhanced by the HDP drives’ finite element analysis and multi body simulations conducted extensively to identify the stress pattern on each of the main components and to optimize the design for:

• System structural stiffness

• Gear geometry

• Shaft deflection

• Extended gear and bearing lifetime

An Australasian example of the drives locally engineered for a waste water application cost-effectively integrated 55kW six-pole motors with HDP helical parallel series drive featuring output shaft dry well and a mechanically driven OP2 lubrication pump.

The drives – specified for 55kW power and 10 kNm output torque – incorporated an integral mechanically driven OP2 lubrication pump to ensure optimum bearing performance in vertical motor mounting arrangements.

They were also epoxy coated for optimum corrosion protection, cleanliness and durability. The drives incorporated an output shaft dry well feature to safeguard against oil leaks into process liquids as seals age and wear.

“While these particular drives were for aerators at a wastewater treatment plant, many of the features apply equally well to similarly robust process applications involving other infrastructure applications as well as challenging applications in food and beverage manufacturing and minerals processing liquids,” says Mr Lewis.

One of the outstanding flexibility features of Bonfiglioli’s new Australasian production and testing line for HD drives is that the company can readily adapt specific drives to particular applications.

“For example, drive bearings were engineered to accept greater loads generated by the long shafts found in aerator applications. The drives are also specifically configured for applications where they are mounted vertically,” he says.

Bonfiglioli’s HD series drives are also being incorporated into Bonfiglioli’s unique locally engineered drives including hi torque, alignment-free and power pack innovations.

Bonfiglioli has invested extensively in state-of-the-art production technology, backed by in-house technical expertise with major investments in stocking and service.

The post Mixing it Bonfig style appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Bird’s Life in Brazil – Prosthetic Titanium 3D Printed Metal Beak

 

A beak for Gigi the macaw has been created with an Mlab cusing R from Concept Laser as 3D printing merges with veterinarian science

A beak for Gigi the macaw has been created with an Mlab cusing R from Concept Laser as 3D printing merges with veterinarian science

Sometimes a story from the world of 3D printing sounds so incredible you just don’t believe your ears. For the first time a prosthetic titanium beak has been manufactured using 3D metal printing and implanted on Gigi, a blue macaw (a genus of the parrot family), in Brazil. This unusual prosthetic saved Gigi’s life, as macaws are unable to eat solid foods without a beak.

The illegal trade of wild birds is a sad story of greed, and it doesn’t just happen in Brazil. The victims are magnificent creatures whose very beauty can end up being their downfall. During Gigi’s captivity at the hands of illegal bird traders, poor housing conditions caused severe malformation of the bird’s beak. Ultimately, Gigi was freed by the Brazilian police, but the magnificent bright blue and yellow feathered macaw could no longer be fed without a beak. A team of veterinarians, together with 3D printing experts from the Renato Archer Technology and Information Center (CTI) in Campinas, Brazil, developed an implant solution for the bird. The successful operation took place at the Animal Care Center in Ipiranga near Sao Paulo.

An interdisciplinary team effort

The artificial beak was created thanks to the cooperation of three specialists. The team, dubbed the ‘Avengers’, comprised veterinarian Roberto Fecchio, 3D designer and facial-reconstruction specialist Cicero Moraes and veterinary dentist Paul Miamoto.

The Avengers are pioneers in the use of 3D printing technology for saving the life of wild animals, having previously made a new shell for Freddy the turtle and a beak for an injured toucan. These prosthetics were made of plastic. In the case of Gigi, plastic was not suitable. Macaws use their beaks to open seeds and break other hard shells, meaning that their beaks need to be extremely long-lasting and strong. This being the case, the team decided on the extremely hard material titanium. Titanium presented itself as the perfect solution, as it is biocompatible, lightweight and corrosion-resistant. Many prosthetics for people are produced using titanium today, so why not try using the material to help a wild bird?

First LaserCusing, then a successful operation

Mr Miamo to began by taking a series of photographs of the malformed beak. From these, Mr Moraes created a digital 3D model for the perfectly fitting prosthetic. The beak was then laser melted at the Renato Archer Technology and Information Center (CTI).

Gigi’s artificial beak was created using a Mlab cusing R from Concept Laser, with which especially delicate parts with high surface quality can be manufactured. The smallest system model from Lichtenfels proved to be the right choice for saving Gigi’s life. The operation then took place at the Animal Care Center in Sao Paulo. Veterinarians Roberto Fecchio, Sergio Camargo, Rodrigo Rabello and Methus Rabello participated. The 3D-printed prosthetic was secured in place with bone cement and orthopedic screws. Just 48 hours after the operation, Gigi was able to try out the beak. She made a fantastic recovery at the Center for Research and Screening of Wild Animals (CEPTAS) at Unimonte University. Gigi is currently awaiting placement at a zoo, where visitors can marvel at the bird’s one-of-a-kind beak secured in place with colorful rhinestone-styled screws. The other birds are going to be seriously jealous.

Bottom line

All’s well that ends well. Examples like Gigi show that 3D-printed medical technology isn’t just capable of providing greater quality of life to people. The unlimited geometric freedom of the process enables the manufacture of perfectly fitting implants ideally suitable for each respective application. Ultimately, it was able to help a magnificent wild bird overcome injuries and deformities, so there is good news in our often uncertain and sometimes unsettling world.

The post Bird’s Life in Brazil – Prosthetic Titanium 3D Printed Metal Beak appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Composite stainless/galvanised steel stirs up big interest

Imagine a stainless steel finish on one side and galvanised on the flip-side of a composite clad panel.

Imagine a stainless steel finish on one side and galvanised on the flip-side of a composite clad panel.

Imagine a stainless steel finish on one side and galvanised on the flip-side of a composite clad panel. A strong stainless steel finish out in front, and galvanised protection to boot in behind… but now imagine one third cheaper than the price of regular stainless steel.

Fresh to New Zealand comes a product that is causing a stir down in the deep south according to Gary Fahey, managing director of Composite Solutions, a subsidiary of Dan Cosgrove 2014 Ltd of Timaru.

“When I saw it I just had to go and see it for myself,” says Mr Fahey of the evolution from on-screen to an in-factory visit to supplier Changsong Group/ Simpson steel in ChangZhou, China.

Now, he has the sole distribution rights to Australia and New Zealand for the clad plate.

“We have the local council interested… imagine it in water, waste water and effluent tanks too, there’s a host of applications where people want the finish of stainless steel and its superior corrosion properties just on one side but also the protection of galvanised steel, which is well accepted on the outside in the atmosphere. This does both, but with a major cost advantage over normal stainless steel. Everyone I show this to experiences that ‘lightbulb moment’ where it clicks and the most common statement is, ‘It just makes sense’, explains Mr Fahey.

The stainless steel clad panel is manufactured from two components: top faceplate (stainless steel), bottom (galvanised steel) with a macromolecular polymer resin adhesive in between.

The macromolecular polymer resin forms an insulating barrier by total separation between the two dissimilar metals stopping electrolysis.

“It can be machined, laser cut, bent, punched,” says Mr Fahey, “it’s so very versatile while also highly aesthetic with that added peace-of-mind of galvanised insulation to protect it from environmental conditions and provide high corrosion resistance.”

The product is central to Changsong’s ‘green technology’ stable of products. 

He says there are limits to its use but within its parameters, Mr Fahey is adamant there is a strong market for what is a quality composite metal.

It has high elongation and can be easily processed and shaped, but there are added benefits as well with reduced vibration due to the polymer membrane (far greater than ordinary stainless steel), and sound insulation is also higher thanks to the interlayer’s viscous properties and a low through current means even greater electrical resistance. Yes, you read correctly, electrical resistance in a stainless steel.

Currently the product is in use in tank construction, irrigation pipes, elevators, escalators, industries requiring high food grade protocols and extensively used in the manufacture of whiteware.

Mr Fahey says his trip to China was an eye opener, with the manufacturing facilities simply “blowing him away”.

“I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s no wonder this composite material is making a stake for an international marketshare as it’s been put through all the testing cycles and has come out on top.”

The composite material is available with 304 and 316 grades of stainless steel and using the same process can have either copper or aluminium bonded to the galvanised steel as well.

P: + 64 3 687 9440 E: compositesolutionsltd@gmail.com

PO Box 974, Timaru. 31 Leckie St, Timaru 7910, New Zealand

The post Composite stainless/galvanised steel stirs up big interest appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

South Fence Machinery: Wired for Success

Christchurch-based South Fence Machinery knows the lay of the engineering land well, and it was ‘real estate’ and the need to maximise it that ultimately saw the investment in a brand new Okuma MU6300V-L 5-axis vertical machining centre - it’s done more than fill the gap.

Christchurch-based South Fence Machinery knows the lay of the engineering land well, and it was ‘real estate’ and the need to maximise it that ultimately saw the investment in a brand new Okuma MU6300V-L 5-axis vertical machining centre – it’s done more than fill the gap.

Christchurch-based South Fence Machinery knows the lay of the engineering land well, and it was ‘real estate’ and the need to maximise it that ultimately saw the investment in a brand new Okuma MU6300V-L 5-axis vertical machining centre – it’s done more than fill the gap.

Walking through the massive 52,000 square foot Sockburn workshop and you sense the Kiwi engineering No. 8 wire that has come before. Like tracking the growth of a child’s height with lines on a door frame, South Fence’s rich Kiwi engineering heritage is shown through a wide assortment of variously aged machines: mostly Okuma. It’s not a graveyard though, more of a fully-functional machining Mecca. All the machines are still in use, and get put to good use.

“It’s fair to say South Fence has had a long relationship with the Okuma brand,” co-director Martin Neill tells Engineering News with a welcoming southern smile. And he’s quick to point out, “our growth has come with a need for new machines and when it comes to that, and in today’s engineering environment, it’s what comes after the purchase that really counts today.”

The company has invested heavily as international demand has grown for its quality Kiwi-made wire fence machinery and associated equipment. Saying that South Fence is churning out machinery would not do credit to the quality, but with at least three machines a year on the books and high demand from overseas sources, Mr Neill knows that schedule is everything and down time is not an option.

“We have to know that if anything goes wrong there are places, people and parts to turn to. We get that from Okuma. Sure, the new machines we now have on site are faster, more functional and outperform previous models, however machine performance is only a small part of what our business needs from such heavy investment. Back up service and support is critical after the initial investment has been made,” says Mr Neill.

South Fence is the only New Zealand Company to manufacture a complete suite of wire fence machines – fixed knot, hinge joint and stiff stay, covering almost every fencing need from camels in desert sands to cows in gentle pastures; from deer in alpine meadows to security alongside motorways, rail tracks or surrounding buildings.

Co-director Ben Byers is in total agreement, explaining that for them it’s about getting as much as they can from what they have got through maximising efficiencies.

“All of these machines are basically real estate,” he explains, gesturing at the pure physical sizes of two older Okuma machines on site: MCV-A and MCR-A double column machining centres, both still playing a major part in the manufacture of necessary components for their wire machines. But Mr Byers isn’t talking purely of the machine taking up floor space, instead explaining that every machine has to produce parts that are a match for the machining capability available, allowing more efficient production of parts at the limits of the machines machining envelope.

“We have to find the most efficient and cost-effective ways to produce our machines to meet our current market and production demands. With the new Okuma [MU6300V-L] we’ve removed the small – medium sized parts from our larger machines and some of the more complex parts from our machining centres, streamlining the production process. We now have all bases covered and have the right machine for the job, big or small.”

Having a wide range of machining options also means the company can tailor each machine’s specifications to suit customer requirements, while also being able to offer a wider range of general engineering services to the wider Canterbury region.

“Every year we are expected to design and manufacture increasingly complex production machine solutions. To ensure we can use the current CAD/CAM packages efficiently and to continue producing the complex parts required to achieve this, our machine technology and machining techniques must be at the multi-axis/multi-tasking machine level,” explains Mr Byers, also highlighting the ability of multi axis machines reducing multiple machining operations.

With the right machines for the job, South Fence’s 25 staff design and build its wire fence machines for A to Z, using in-house technology and the latest manufacturing techniques to meet its own high quality standards.

The MU6300V-L is an impressive unit with both co-directors singing the praises of a machine that also “sings” sweetly as it works.

“Accuracy, capacity, versatility…. there’s not really much more you could ask for in a 5-axis machine,” says Mr Neill.

The MU6300V-L’s highly rigid trunnion table supports high accuracy 5-axis machining, while the machine’s efficiency and capacity is driven through intelligent technologies that allow excellent 3-axis machining and 5-axis machining with the additional ability of face, end and intricate CNC turning capabilities.

Operator access and visibility has been paramount in design and with a large machining range, tools can be changed with the trunnion still in swing position.

It’s these types of features that attracted South Fence to purchase another Okuma; the second new machine in the space of a year.

“We have an Okuma that is a good 20 years old,” says Mr Neill of the MX55VB. “It still works well but with more business we needed more flexibility so about 12 months ago we bought an Okuma M560V-R machining centre.”

The older machine gives as good as it gets, but the pair agree that the new unit has brought significant improvements in speed, functionality and performance.

The follow on post sale, as mentioned, is vital for the well-oiled business to keep the cogs of progress in motion. With Okuma still able to supply many parts for its older machines, Mr Neill and Mr Byers know that even their machinery purchases of up to 28 years ago have plenty of life left in them yet.

All machinery is fully supported with the very latest cad-cam technology ensuring the very best of Kiwi machinery can be seen on the world and local stage.

The post South Fence Machinery: Wired for Success appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Boost your engineering career with a masters degree

Alex Rivera Diaz,Geothermal engineer, MEnergy graduate

Alex Rivera Diaz,Geothermal engineer, MEnergy graduate

If you’re thinking of upskilling to work in a new area, advancing to a management role, or are interested in career in research, a postgraduate qualification from the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Engineering will provide you with the right mix of practical experience, theoretical understanding, and industry insights to help you become a leader in your field.

The Faculty of Engineering offers a wide range of programmes, both full time and part-time, that are suitable for busy professionals. As New Zealand’s top engineering faculty, we boast world-class and award-winning academics, advanced facilities, and a supportive, collaborative culture that encourages the development of innovative, future-forward research.

Our masters programmes in particular are an ideal complement to those who already possess undergraduate degrees and industry experience. Read about them below, or visit www.engineering.auckland.ac.nz/postgrads for information on all our available postgraduate options.

Master of Engineering (ME)

This research-based programme allows you to specialise on a subject of your choice under supervision from a leading expert in their field.

Master of Engineering Studies (MEngSt)

A taught masters programme with a diverse selection of specialisations, allowing you to tailor your learning towards your professional goals and interests.

Master of Engineering Management (MEMgt)

Offered jointly by the Faculty of Engineering and the Auckland Business School, the MEMgt is a taught programme that is sometimes referred to as ‘an MBA for engineers.’

Master of Energy (MEnergy)

This programme is ideal for engineering, science or commerce graduates who want to develop their technical, business or policy-related expertise in the energy industry.

Master of Disaster Management (MDisMgt)

This taught programme focuses on building your skills in the highly relevant areas of disaster risk reduction, response, recovery, resilience and management.

Master of Operations Research (MOR)

This research programme develops your skills in a field that incorporates engineering, mathematics, economics and science to create optimal solutions to complex problems.

 

The post Boost your engineering career with a masters degree appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

2017 MESNZ Engineering Scholarship

NMEC2016As part of the MESNZ objective “To encourage New Zealand training into tertiary education and technology”, a MESNZ Scholarship worth up to $5,000 is to be offered each year, for the specific purpose of covering tuition fees.

This scholarship is available to assist students commencing study towards a MESNZ/IPENZ accredited engineering degree, diploma or certificate from any year level.

Applications are sought from candidates interested in maintenance engineering as a career. Students from anywhere in New Zealand are encouraged to apply for the MESNZ scholarship. Students with links to MESNZ through work or other avenues are urged to apply.

Download a copy of the Scholarship Application form here.

Kind regards
Bill Sole
MESNZ Committee
b.sole@competenz.org.nz

The post 2017 MESNZ Engineering Scholarship appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Filtering out the chaff with Flexicon

A new manual dumping station with integral Flexi-Disc tubular cable conveyor from Flexicon collects dust created during manual dumping from bags, boxes, pails and other containers, and gently conveys the material at any angle over short or long distances.

A new manual dumping station with integral Flexi-Disc tubular cable conveyor from Flexicon collects dust created during manual dumping from bags, boxes, pails and other containers, and gently conveys the material at any angle over short or long distances.

A new manual dumping station with integral Flexi-Disc tubular cable conveyor from Flexicon collects dust created during manual dumping from bags, boxes, pails and other containers, and gently conveys the material at any angle over short or long distances.

The unit features a high velocity vacuum fan that draws airborne dust from the operator’s atmosphere onto cartridge filters. Automatic reverse-pulse filter cleaning allows continuous, efficient operation; timer-activated solenoid valves release short blasts of compressed plant air inside the filters causing dust build-up on outer filter surfaces to fall into the hopper.

Filters are readily accessed by removing the interior baffle, and replaced using quick-disconnect fittings.

The conveyor moves material using high-strength polymer discs affixed to a stainless steel or galvanised cable, that slide fragile materials within smooth stainless steel tubing, gently, quietly and dust-free, horizontally, vertically or at any incline. The discs and cable are driven by a wheel at one end of the circuit and put under tension by a wheel at the other end, and fully evacuate the conveyor of material.

The modular system can have single or multiple inlets and outlets, and convey over short distances or hundreds of metres.

The post Filtering out the chaff with Flexicon appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Smart devices rely on even smarter engineering

As industrial machines become more sophisticated and connected, the need for ‘smart engineering’ and detailed application knowledge continues to grow to increase productivity and safety, lower risk and reduce costs of compliance.

As industrial machines become more sophisticated and connected, the need for ‘smart engineering’ and detailed application knowledge continues to grow to increase productivity and safety, lower risk and reduce costs of compliance.

As industrial machines become more sophisticated and connected, the need for ‘smart engineering’ and detailed application knowledge continues to grow to increase productivity and safety, lower risk and reduce costs of compliance.

Peter Tomazic, senior solution consultant with the Global Solutions team at Rockwell Automation has more than 25 years experience in ‘thinking outside the square’ to successfully solve customers’ unique challenges, whether it involves engineering for cranes, pulp and paper machinery, process lines, mining applications, printing presses and the list goes on.

He explains that while providing the hardware is only 30-40 percent of the solution, it is the domain knowledge on the application and how to apply the engineering that really makes the difference.

“Anyone can go and buy hardware and try to put it together but it is the application knowledge of how to engineer the hardware that really adds value to our customers operations.

“As part of the Global Solutions team at Rockwell Automation, we leverage our in depth technical knowledge and work with customers to understand their unique challenges and goals. We can then design, manufacture and commission a solution to meet their production and business objectives,” says Mr Tomazic.

Driving innovation

Advances in technologies such as the Industrial Internet of Things, are enabling machines to get smarter and meet endusers networking, integration, diagnostics and intelligence demands. Motors and drives are gaining improved integration and connectivity, resulting in increased productivity, safety and asset management.

“Ethernet communications is now an important part of any application that involves drives because it provides full access to all the diagnostics within the drives, including drive parameters, status and additional features such as automatic device configuration,” explains Mr Tomazic.

Automatic Device Configuration is a feature that increases uptime by allowing the Logix controller to automatically detect a replaced drive and download all configuration parameters, eliminating the need for manual reconfiguration.

While supplying the drives is the easy part, applying the correct engineering is critical for the system to run safely and effectively. For example, if a drive on a crane has not been selected or engineered correctly the crane could drop its load resulting in safety and productivity risks.

Similarly, if a drive on a process line is not sized or engineered appropriately, the process will not run effectively. Mr Tomazic and his team at Rockwell Automation leverage many years of experience to apply this type of smart engineering and help customers improve system performance, reduce risk and gain operation efficiencies.

Complying with safety

Complying with safety standards plays an important role in reducing the risk of injuries and improving productivity. Implementing the most appropriate standards and technologies also provide major improvements in manufacturing productivity, efficiency and the morale of personnel. However, understanding the current risk level of one machine or an entire plant floor is a challenging task.

“Safeguarding a machine or entire plant requires a detailed safety assessment to be undertaken. Following the findings of the safety assessment we can then design a solution that meets the operational requirements of the plant or machine and also address any safety risks,” says Mr Tomazic.

Once the assessment is complete and the safety solution is designed and validated, the solution can then be integrated and commissioned to enhance productivity and workplace safety. The Global Solutions team at Rockwell Automation provide end-to-end safety solutions and can help at any stage of safeguarding a project- from training and standards through to validation and startup.

Information and integration

The Industrial Internet of Things continues to bridge the gap between the physical and virtual worlds; generating data that provides visibility into operational issues to help improve profitability and reliability. Connected, smart machinery can enable secure, remote access services that reduce operational costs throughout the lifecycle of machinery.

“Our solutions are always capable of being connected into any enterprise system. We recently integrated a historian system into a large crane at a power station. This system provides information about how many times the hoist has worked and its maximum load which can be used to calculate end of lifecycle parameters. For example, if the crane is 25 years old but only works two percent of the time then it still has more life in it,” says Mr Tomazic.

These smart solutions provide more information and transparency to improve the lifespan of equipment and drive productivity throughout the enterprise. Smart engineering combined with detailed application knowledge can help increase machine speed for increased production or improve machine control to optimise quality as well as quantity.

The post Smart devices rely on even smarter engineering appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Kaeser launches electric portable compressor range

Kaeser has announced the launch of its electric portable compressor range.

Kaeser has announced the launch of its electric portable compressor range.

Kaeser has announced the launch of its electric portable compressor range. The new Mobilair electric portable compressors deliver zero emissions and substantial savings in operating costs – wherever a power supply is available.

The new electric portable compressors from Kaeser, are powered by motors rated at 15–25 kW, and form part of the highly successful family of Mobilair M27, M31 and M50 compressors. From large building projects to city-centre sites or indoor operations – emission-free electric-powered portable compressors are exceptionally quiet and are significantly easier on the wallet than diesel units.

These machines are ideal for environmentally sensitive areas such as clean air zones or building sites near hospitals. They are also perfect for tunnel construction or as bridge compressors for industrial stations. On large construction projects, where power hook-ups are usually available, the electric compressors make even more sense, as electricity is generally much cheaper than diesel fuel. Another advantage: electric compressors cost far less to maintain.

Power consumption is kept to a minimum thanks to the inclusion of IE3 premium efficiency motors, which meet the IP55 enclosure and Class F insulation standards, as well as comply with and exceed prevailing Australian GEMS regulations for 3 phase electric motors.

The Mobilair electric portable compressors are equipped as standard with the advanced Sigma Control Smart controller and Kaeser`s patented anti-frost control. The Sigma control smart makes set-up and operation – such as pressure adjustments – quick and simple with an easy-to-read colour display and the anti-frost control protects tools from frost and corrosion.

The models are available with a choice of a rotational moulded polyethylene or metal enclosure and in both road-going and stationary versions. Flow rates range between 2 and 5 m³/min for pressures from 7 to 14 bar.

Kaeser has also introduced its latest generation M57 Utility portable compressor. Compact, convenient and cost-effective the M57 Utility is now configured for even greater flexibility thanks to a number of new design features. The latest generation M57 Utility retains all of the original series popular features, including its compact size – crucial for truck-mounting, upward expelling exhaust gas outlet and all-round intelligent design.

The unit is configured as standard for an impressive temperature range from -10°C to +50°C, whilst a version designed for even lower ambient temperatures is offered with pre-warming of the motor cooling water.

In addition to the proven and renowned 7-bar version, which up until now delivered 5.4 m³/min, a new model with a flow rate of 4.7 m³/min at 10 bar maximum pressure is now available and ideal for applications such as sand-blasting.

With the intelligent Sigma control smart (SCM) controller fitted as standard, pressure can be reduced down to 5 bar in precise 0.1 bar increments for perfect adjustment to on-site conditions. The appropriate pressure setting helps protect, for example hammer drills that operate at 6 bar for optimum performance, from wear. The colour display provides a convenient overview of all operating parameters, alarm notifications and upcoming required maintenance. Motor start-up is made easy with just the push of a button.

The service-friendliness of the Mobilair series has always been a key characteristic of all models in the range and this has never been truer than with the compact M57 Utility. The unit is designed in such a way that all maintenance points are easily accessible from the cargo bed side once the panels have been removed. Fuelling is performed from the front side. Operating fluids and liquids can be easily drained via externally mounted service connections without having to hoist up or lift the compressor unit.Also the low-positioned compressed air take-off taps and the metal cover protected operating panel. This attention to detail makes operation especially easy, particularly when the unit is installed on a lorry cargo bed. For even higher compressed air quality requirements, the M57 Utility can be optionally equipped with a compressed air aftercooler.

The Mobilair M 57 Utility portable compressor from Kaeser is available in two pressure stages 7 bar (5.4 m3/min) and 10 bar (4.7 m3/min).

The post Kaeser launches electric portable compressor range appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

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