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SouthMach Manufacturing and Electronics Exhibition

24 - 25 May 2017

Wednesday 24th 9am-6pm
Thursday 25th 9am-4pm

Horncastle Arena Christchurch

Exhibitor Enquiry

Visitor

Information

Exhibiting

Information

Industry

Education

Work Safe New Zealand
University of Canterbury
Ford
NZ Manufacturer
Maintenance Engineering Societ
NZMEA
IEDA
Engineering News
DEMM engineering & manufacturi
Warehouse stationary
Work Safe New Zealand
University of Canterbury
Ford
NZ Manufacturer
Maintenance Engineering Societ
NZMEA
IEDA
Engineering News
DEMM engineering & manufacturi
Warehouse stationary

MACHINERY HOUSE HAS THE RIGHT MACHINE FOR EVERY JOB

machinery-house

It’s been a year since Machinery House moved into its new purpose built premises at 2 Waiouru Road, Highbrook, Auckland.

It’s been a year since Machinery House moved into its new purpose built premises at 2 Waiouru Road, Highbrook, Auckland and branch manager, Miles Donald says it’s been a great experience for the business and Machinery House’s customers.

It’s easy to see why customers would enjoy what the extra space entails – now all the machinery is on the showroom floor and it gives you the opportunity to get up close to it – “it’s really helpful for customers who want to see the machinery and touch it,” Miles says.

The move from their old premises was predicated on the need to cater for their customers’ desire to be able to see everything the company stocked and also to be able to hold greater numbers of stock and spare parts, Miles says.

“Before we were only able to show about a quarter of what we stock. Now we have one of every machine that we stock on the floor. We now hold much more stock and have a lot more pallet space. We have been growing each year and for the past four years there has been huge growth in our market and we want to be able to cater for it.

“If a customer wants to bring in a material they will use, our technicians will run it through the machine. So they know it’ll be the right machine for the right job.

“At the end of the day it’s all about the customer. If they want it, we have to have it ready to go. We are forever increasing our products. We are really here to make life easier for our customers. If we don’t have what they want here we can get it within three weeks from Australia.

“We do a shipment of spare parts weekly. We can do it efficiently and quickly – significantly reducing downtime,” Miles says.

Walking around the massive showroom floor it’s hard not to be impressed by the sheer volume and choice of machines on offer. The whole place is very clean and incredibly well organised. Miles points out that that is the Machinery House way.

The extensive range of stock that Machinery House holds – all of which is available online through its comprehensive website – is part of the company’s strategy to increase its market share in New Zealand.

Its experienced sales team, solid and dependable back-up service and wide vast industry knowledge all enhance the professional image that has ensured Machinery House stays ahead of the game. Its dedicated sales team has decades of technical experience in all trades, which allows them to get the job done.

Miles says that they are in the process of growing staff numbers and at present have three technicians and four storemen onsite to help customers. In addition, the technical team pre-run and test all outgoing equipment. This results in fast onsite commissioning for customers, no matter where they are.

Keeping their customer base up to speed with the latest on offer is also achieved through their annual 212 page fully priced catalogue and in-house built and maintained website that is always kept up to date.

Customers can obtain all the information they require in machinery and other products – from technical specifications to shipping information – such as weight and volume, as well as pricing. This all enables customers to be fully armed with all the information they need to make the right choice. Miles also says that from early next year all of their pricing will be coming down – online and in the catalogue.

One of the popular features of the website is Machinery House’s mates offers, which has been growing steadily, year to year. Customers benefit with a free $20 voucher with purchases over $100 and $50 for purchases over $300.

Miles says one of the new additions to their product range has been Swiftcut plasma cutting machinery – which is fully CNC.

“it’s already becoming very strong in the market with excellent back-up service and technical support. The Swiftcut is made in the UK and the plasma is US made Hypertherm – so you know that it is high quality machinery,” Miles says. “it’s taken off really well and we have good stock and supplies ready to go.”

The wide range carried by Machinery House covers the whole spectrum of the engineering industry – from the enthusiast working at home to the engineering professional. The company sources and distributes both locally and imported equipment.

Euroquip is one of our biggest suppliers that we buy off locally,” Miles says. “We are one of the biggest distributors for Auckland based precision engineers and machine tools manufacturers, RR Bramley, which produces high quality metal cutting, forming, shaping, and grinding equipment under the Bramley, Linishall and Garrick machine tools brands and New Zealand made Bulldozer horizontal benders.

“We sell imported metalworking and sheet metal fabrication equipment from Hafco Metalmaster, Soco, Sunrise, Sahinler, Optimum, Powerbuilt Tools, and Rong Fu. We also distribute pwer tools, grease guns and Hitachi electric chain blocks.”

Machinery House really does have it all and with a fully air-conditioned showroom with all it stocks on display, customers get to touch and feel what they may wish to buy and make sure it’s the right tool for the job, every time. The other added bonus is a very roomy dedicated pick-up area outside.

For more information contact Machinery House,

Tel; 09 271 7234,

Visit: www.machineryhouse.co.nz

The post MACHINERY HOUSE HAS THE RIGHT MACHINE FOR EVERY JOB appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

NEW PRODUCTS TARGET HEALTH AND SAFETY

Youngman Richardson & Co Ltd is excited about the release of its new line up of innovative materials handling products.

Youngman Richardson & Co Ltd is excited about the release of its new line up of innovative materials handling products.

Youngman Richardson & Co Ltd is excited about the release of its new line up of innovative materials handling products.

The introduction of these new brands from European manufacturers Wienold Lifte and Winlet is very timely due to health and safety regulations and work load.

Wienold is a counterbalance materials handling lift that can operate flush to walls making it ideal for glass installation. Compact and maneuverable the Wienold lift is designed to improve productivity and efficiency for glazing and other material lift applications where space is limited.

Combining simplicity with some very clever technology the Wienold GML800+ DC Glass and Material Lifter is one of those pieces of lifting equipment you just have to admire. This flagship model has many features including a powerful 24V electric winch that allows 900kg to be lifted to a height of 3.5 metres with a safe working load of 800kg. The GML 800+DC is unique in that the adjustable stabilising legs can be used at both the back and the front of the machine. Furthermore when fitted with the overhead glazing manipulator the machine provides 360 degree rotation for precision installation.

Other models in the range include the Wienold WLU Premium and SLK models that are designed for easy access through standard internal doorways and are very transportable.

The Winlet Window Robot is the revolutionary new way option to install windows. With its big suction cups not only does it quickly and dramatically improve health and safety in the workplace it also results in faster installations without damage to the glass. There are two models in the range to start with one of which can lift window elements weighing 350kg, the other 575kg. Both models can easily be adapted to lift a wide range of materials including granite, concrete and steel plates simply by changing the suction cups.

For further information contact Youngman Richardson & Co Ltd
Tel: 09 443 2436 or for South Island enquires, Tel: 03 341 6923

The post NEW PRODUCTS TARGET HEALTH AND SAFETY appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Rethinking Plastics

PRESS RELEASE

 

‘Rethinking Plastics’ – Insights into the bioplastic materials of the future 11th European Bioplastics Conference in Berlin

‘Rethinking Plastics’ – Insights into the bioplastic materials of the future 11th European Bioplastics Conference in Berlin

‘Rethinking Plastics’ – Insights into the bioplastic materials of the future 11th European Bioplastics Conference in Berlin attracts 300 experts from around the world.

Berlin, 1 December 2016 – The 11th European Bioplastics Conference took place on 29/30 November 2016 in Berlin, attracting around 300 participants from industry, policy, research, and media. In his keynote speech, Hugo-Maria Schally, Head of Unit Sustainable Production, Products & Consumption, DG Environment at the European Commission, stressed the necessityfor a coherent policy approach to support bio-based products in Europe: “The European Commission is committed to making the circular economy reality as it brings together environmental protection and social and economic gains. The EU Circular Economy Package aims to provide a supportive policy and legislative framework and incentives for innovative industries, such as bioplastics. The upcoming Plastics Strategy will also aim at addressing the challenge of high dependency on fossil feedstock.”
Opening the 11th edition of the annual European Bioplastics Conference, François de Bie, Chairman of
European Bioplastics (EUBP), said: “Europe is a world leader in developing and commercialising
renewable, bio-based products. This year’s conference is yet again witness to the many technological
innovations and the outstanding progress of the bioplastics industry in ‘rethinking plastics’ in a
sustainable, circular, and resource efficient way. We welcome the commitment of EU legislators to
move away from the linear economic model towards a circular economy that uses resources more
efficiently and that links to a stronger bioeconomy. Their support is a crucial signal to our industry and
investors in the bioeconomy at a time of continued low oil prices and subsidies of the fossil fuel
industry.”
A highly anticipated session was the presentation of the 2016 annual market data update delivered by
Kristy-Barbara Lange, Deputy Managing Director of EUBP, on the second day of the conference: “The
positive trend of the past ten years continues. According to our latest market data, the global
bioplastics production capacity is predicted to grow by 50 percent in the next five years,” said Lange.
This development was confirmed in several presentations by large brands, such as Renault, Henkel,
Tetra Pak, and Kimberly-Clark, outlining their commitments and initiatives to reduce their
environmental footprint and the role of bioplastics in achieving these ambitious goals. The Netherlands
Standardization Institute NEN launched their new certification scheme for bio-based products based
on the European standard EN 16785-1, and the first two certificates were issued to Corbion, a leading
producer of high performance PLA, and Kraton, a leading biorefiner of pine chemicals, during the
conference.
Rodenburg, Taghleef, and Mars were awarded the 11th Annual Bioplastics Award, hosted by
bioplastics MAGAZINE during a special ceremony, for the development of bio-based wrappers for the
Snickers chocolate bars. The innovative material for the wrapper is made from starch derived from
potato cutting waste and PLA. The project is the result of the collaboration between three companies,
including Dutch bioplastics producer Rodenburg, who developed the material, Taghleef, who
manufactured the film, and Mondi, who printed the packaging.
The 11th European Bioplastics Conference 2016 attracted around 300 participants from 150 companies
and 29 countries to connect and catch up on the latest developments, issues, debates, and trends in
the bioplastics industry in Europe. 22 companies showcased a great diversity of the latest products,materials, and applications at the exhibition alongside the conference.

European Bioplastics extends a special thank you to the sponsors of this year’s anniversary
conference: BASF, Braskem, Corbion, DuPont, NatureWorks, Perstorp, Tereos, BIOTEC, and Sulzer,
for their support to make the 11th edition of the European Bioplastics Conference another successful
meeting of our industry.
Impressions of the 11th European Bioplastics Conference 2016 are available at: http://www.europeanbioplastics.
org/news/multimedia-pictures-videos/ (© European Bioplastics)
More information on the market data update is also available on the website: http://www.europeanbioplastics.
org/market-data-update-2016/
For more information about the Bioplastics Award, the winner, and finalists, please go to:
www.bioplasticsmagazine.com.
Speakers at the 11th European Bioplastics Conference 2016:
Ylwa Alwarsdotter (SEKAB Sweden), Jasmin Bauer (Knoten Weimar), Julia-Maria Blesin (Hochschule Hannover), Martin
Bussmann (BASF), Srirojpinyo Chinnawat (PTT MCC Biochem Joint Venture of PTT and Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation), Steve
Davies (NatureWorks), François de Bie (European Bioplastics), Steve Dejonghe (Looplife Polymers), Ortwin Ertl (Annikki GmbH),
Christian Garaffa (Novamont), Mike Gross (Kimberly-Clark), Yuki Hamilton (Braskem), Constance Ißbrücker (European Bioplastics),
Eva Knüpffer (Fraunhofer-Institut für Bauphysik (IBP)), Martina Koralek (NABU – Naturschutzbund Deutschland e.V.), Waldemar
Kütt (European Commission), Kristy-Barbara Lange (European Bioplastics), Christian Lenges (DuPont Industrial BioSciences),
Delphine Lévi-Alvarès (Zero Waste Europe), Enrique Moliner (AIMPLAS), Jean-Marc Nony (Sphere/Club Bio-plastiques), Peter
O’Sullivan (Henkel Ireland Operations & Research / RD&E European Technology Centre), Rob Opsomer (Ellen MacArthur
Foundation), Alexia Roma (Technocentre Renault), Sugimoto Ryuichiro (PTT MCC Biochem Joint Venture of PTT and Mitsubishi
Chemical Corporation), Hugo-Maria Schally (European Commission), Stefanie Siebert (European Compost Network),
Mariagiovanna Vetere (European Bioplastics), Erwin Vink (Holland Bioplastics), Peter A. von den Kerkhoff (DuPont Tate & Lyle),
Hugo Vuurens (Corbion), Marie Wheat (United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)), Harmen Willemse (NEN – Netherlands
Standardization Institute), Sabine Wirén-Lehr (Tetra Pak International), Justin Zeulner (Green Sports Alliance), Patrick
Zimmermann (FKuR).
Exhibitors at the 11th European Bioplastics Conference 2016:
API, BASF, bioplastics MAGAZINE, BIOTEC GmbH & Co. KG, Carbiolice, Corbion, DIN CERTCO, ECHO, EuropaBio, FKuR,
Futamura, IfBB, ifeu, Institut für Kunststofftechnik (Universität Stuttgart), NatureWorks, Novamont, OWS, Perstorp, Photanol BV,
PTT MCC Biochem, Vinçotte.
About European Bioplastics:
European Bioplastics is the European association representing the interests of the bioplastics industry along the entire value chain. Its members produce, refine and distribute bioplastics i.e. plastics that are bio-based, biodegradable, or both. More information is available at www.european-bioplastics.org.
Press contact: Katrin Schwede, Head of Communications, European Bioplastics, Marienstr. 19/20, 10117 Berlin,
Tel: +49 (0) 30 28482 353, Fax: +49 (0) 30 284 82 359, press@european-bioplastics.org

The post Rethinking Plastics appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Konecranes gives lift to Australian Steel Convention

Global crane manufacturer and service leader Konecranes is extending its technology and leadership involvement in the steel industry by being a major sponsor of the Australian Steel Convention for the 5th year in a row.

Global crane manufacturer and service leader Konecranes is extending its technology and leadership involvement in the steel industry by being a major sponsor of the Australian Steel Convention for the 5th year in a row.

Global crane manufacturer and service leader Konecranes is extending its technology and leadership involvement in the steel industry by being a major sponsor of the Australian Steel Convention for the 5th year in a row.

At this year’s convention, hosted in Melbourne CBD, Konecranes, which employs over 12,000 people across 600 locations in 48 countries, demonstrated its Uniton crane. Uniton is particularly applicable to the steel industry and related uses such as materials handling, manufacturing and maintenance.

A strong focus this year was also on advanced technologies such as Smart features, lifecycle care through yourKONECRANES and the new Konecranes parts store, all of which are designed to provide a greater level of safety, reliability and information that can help to better plan maintenance and service schedules.

“Our continued support of this convention provides us with a valuable opportunity to discuss the steel industry with other experts and help shape its future into one that is safe, efficient and reliable,” says Konecranes managing director, Australia, New Zealand and Philippines, James Dowe.

Mr Dowe attended Konecranes’ booth at the convention, along with Konecranes head of APAC region, Steve Gagnuss, national industrial equipment sales manager, Peter Monaghan and operations manager, Daniel Mccarney.

“Our company has a strong ethos of safety, which is vital to the steel industry. I’ve had some insightful conversations about the future of the steel industry at past conferences, and we were visited by those interested in cranes for the steel industry who saw the latest advanced technologies for the steel industry,” says Mr Dowe.

“One of our biggest focuses over the past 12 months has been on improving the user experience when deciding on, ordering and receiving a crane, part or service. Our lifecycle care campaign can add years to the overall life of valuable plant and identify problems before they occur,” he says.

Parts store

Konecranes recently launched an intuitive new crane parts store to Australasia, making it easier for customers to find the parts they need, check availabilities and track orders. In addition to the full suite of Konecranes parts, the store will also offer replacement parts for all makes and models of crane, regardless of the original manufacturer.

The new store (store.konecranes.com) is designed to improve inventory and lead time accuracy, as well as make it as simple as possible to find crane parts, regardless of the make or model.

Uniton

Uniton is an excellent all-around crane with good fundamentals and performance. It provides the duty class, hoisting speeds and trolley traversing speeds you need and full compliance with your safety requirements.

Uniton has a number of distinct advantages for steel and related industries, including maintenance-friendly trolley, a range of operator interfaces, extended Speed Range as option and built for the customer’s environment

yourKONECRANES

Konecranes’ new yourKONECRANES customer portal provides direct access to maintenance data – including planned inspections, service and reports – in an easy-to-access and responsive web interface.

Smart Features

Smart features are available on most cranes, and make operations safer and more productive using advanced technologies. Examples include: sway control, target positioning, shock load control, and safety zoning.

Regenerative drive systems

Protected areas are part of safety zoning, a smart feature that allows the user to pre-define areas where the crane cannot enter, preventing collisions with workers or other expensive equipment

All these features are designed to integrate Konecranes’ equipment with customers’ overall handling systems. The simple objective is to increase productivity, reduce manpower and improve energy saving and environmental targets

The post Konecranes gives lift to Australian Steel Convention appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

CST’s plug-and-play wastewater treatment system

 

One of the Australia’s major mining enterprises is benefitting environmentally and in terms of water recycling and conservation from new plug-and-play wastewater treatment systems installed by CST Wastewater Solutions.

One of the Australia’s major mining enterprises is benefitting environmentally and in terms of water recycling and conservation from new plug-and-play wastewater treatment systems installed by CST Wastewater Solutions.

One of the Australia’s major mining enterprises is benefitting environmentally and in terms of water recycling and conservation from new plug-and-play wastewater treatment systems installed by CST Wastewater Solutions. The two modular Smith and Loveless FAST (Fixed Activated Sludge Treatment) systems were delivered to the world class outback mining operation to produce an effluent water quality class of A.

The A grading performance means the water can be recycled for processes around the site, in accord with the company’s ethos of improving quality of life and effectively managing impacts.

The successful installation at this mine follows previous successful installations globally at remote locations such as mining and energy installations and commercial and recreational facilities operating in areas where water is a precious shared resource and where there may be water quality issues.

“The challenge for this project was the remote location,” says CST Wastewater Solutions managing director Mike Bambridge. “The FAST system is the perfect solution for projects like this, because it can be built into standard shipping containers.”

“The plant arrives on site essentially as a complete system requiring only a concrete pad and some relatively minor mechanical and electrical works. Class A effluent is achieved by the addition of a filter and UV sterilisation after the FAST system.”

One of the FAST systems installed is used for the plant workshop, which has a maximum daily flow of 110m3. The second system is installed at the village, for the camp and accommodation block, which has a maximum daily flow of 345m3.

Not only does the system achieve higher loading rates within a smaller footprint, but effluent produced can be recycled into suitable industrial, public facility and commercial processes.

“The FAST system allows this major entity to reuse the effluent water for dust suppression and lubrication water, which helps with their environmental footprint,” says Mr Bambridge.

“The modular format of the FAST System also allows an easy bolt on for any expansion in workforce. For any future major increase of staff numbers, it is a simple matter of adding another FAST 20-foot module. Each system is designed to handle an increase of approximately 200 workers. This could be incorporated in the design,” he says.

“The FAST System has been proven over a long period of time as being a very robust and simple system to operate. It is very reliable because its stable process withstands hydraulic shocks and the bacteria are not washed out into the environment. It is simple to operate and requires no daily operator maintenance, which results in low annual maintenance costs.

“Ease of operation and optimum reliability is very important in remote areas where service contractors and skilled operators can be expensive and in short supply.”

Proven Technology

FAST systems have had other strong successes in the mining and resources industries over the years. One example is when CST Wastewater Solutions supplied and installed a FAST unit for Newcrest’s Cadia Valley Operations (CVO) in NSW to purify human and other waste water and enable it to be recycled on-site.

The treatment system, is part of CVO’s ongoing program to maximise community benefits flowing from a project that will include Australia’s largest underground mine and the world’s fourth largest gold mine.

FAST Systems

FAST achieves nutrient removal for applications containing high level of nitrogen, a water pollutant that has increased significantly in industrial, commercial and municipal applications and which is an environmental concern particularly to resources, engineering, construction, hospitality, marine, agribusiness and public facility and water and waste water infrastructure organisations.

Proven in thousands of installations worldwide, FAST consists of tankage packed with completely submerged media. The FAST media creates a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which, combined with internal settling zones, maintains constant bacterial growth during low-flow and peak usage periods typical of many remote installations. This results in stable operation on a daily basis.

“Simple operation and maintenance means no daily operator requirements and very little annual plant maintenance,” says Mr Bambridge.

The post CST’s plug-and-play wastewater treatment system appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Don’t let cost cuts damage suspension and braking safety

As cost pressures bite on suppliers to major industries, safety can often be the first casualty of cutbacks to operating costs.

As cost pressures bite on suppliers to major industries, safety can often be the first casualty of cutbacks to operating costs.

As cost pressures bite on suppliers to major industries, safety can often be the first casualty of cutbacks to operating costs.

In very price-sensitive industries, such as transport, vehicle maintenance and logistics, cutbacks can lead to contractors turning to non-OEM parts for systems vital to road safety and on-time performance of vehicles.

But the apparent savings on offer from non-genuine parts are often illusory for operators involved in safety-aware industries, such as mining and energy, quarrying, oil and gas, manufacturing, food and agriculture production and processing, construction and infrastructure engineering. Look-alike parts produce only minor and temporary gains in the short term but introduce major and ongoing risk of breakdown, accident and downtime, say major suppliers to the light, medium and heavy vehicle industry.

“Typically as prices go down with non-OEM parts, the margin for safety and reliability sinks with them. These products are not generally as good as the originals they imitate – quality doesn’t come free – and typically they struggle to offer the lifespan and safety margin of genuine parts,’’ says Air Springs Supply Pty Ltd, which is Australian distributor of the world’s top selling air springs for heavy truck suspensions, Firestone.

Of all the trucks on Australian roads today with air suspensions, many are equipped with Firestone Airide air springs. Airide air springs are sold directly to original equipment truck, trailer, and suspension manufacturers.

“Operators buying look-alike products are seldom making any saving at all really – they are just selling their risk management cheaply. Any small savings on products that don’t offer the same quality, performance and reliability as the genuine original can be wiped out in an instant by a single accident of downtime incident that puts a million-dollar truck off the road,” says Air Springs Supply sales manager Russell Chown.

Similar views are voiced by one of Australia’s most experienced specialist heavy brake companies, Australian Brake Controls (ABC) which produces transport, off-highway and industrial machinery braking systems engineered for optimum reliability and safety. ABC is also known for engineering systems for hydraulically braking of light and medium trucks so they can tow air-braked trailers.

“We know it is tough out there for transport and off-highway equipment operators and we are sharing the pain with them. But cutting corners with lower-quality parts is no way to extend the value and life of vehicles and machinery costing hundreds and thousands and sometimes millions of dollars,” says ABC engineer Vinh Lam.

Towing a heavy trailer around worksites can be a potentially hazardous, high maintenance undertaking – especially where vehicles have to cope with the slopes, loads, roads and surfaces encountered around mines, quarries, infrastructure and landscaping sites as well as farms. Trucks, tractors and specialised machinery can be subjected to loads that will place unusual stresses on standard components, including high demands on suspensions and braking systems in situations where operators need to selectively and powerfully apply stopping and holding power.

“Such demanding situations are no place for compromised performance,” says Mr Lam. “If you are going to do it at all, you have got to do it properly. Too much is riding on a vehicle’s suspension and brakes to cut corners.”

Suspension and braking risks also exist for lighter vehicles, says All Air Suspension, which specialises in air helper suspensions for vehicles such as 4WD, utes, vans, and other machinery used for on and off-highway jobs and for towing.

The post Don’t let cost cuts damage suspension and braking safety appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

3D Printing helps makes the world’s fastest female rider

Eva Håkansson is the world’s fastest female motorcycle rider at 270 mph

Eva Håkansson is the world’s fastest female motorcycle rider at 270 mph

Eva Håkansson is the world’s fastest female motorcycle rider at 270 mph. She is a mechanical engineer and the main builder of her electric streamliner motorcycle the ‘KillaJoule’, which also is the world’s fastest electric motorcycle – and 3D printing has played its part. 

Despite an obsession with everything fast, it is not the need for speed that is Ms Håkansson ‘s main drive, as strange as it may sound. She has a mission in her life: to show that eco-friendly electric vehicles don’t have to be slow, and that engineering is a great career choice for women. She also loves building stuff that has never been built before.

Eva received a PhD in Mechanical Engineer from the University of Denver, Colorado, USA, and is working as a consultant in the field of engineering, racing, and high performance electric vehicles. Building and racing the KillaJoule electric motorcycle at the legendary Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, USA is just a very expensive hobby.

Every August, Ms Håkansson takes over the Bonneville Salt Flats where for five days she tests the improvements to the electric motorbike.

The “real purpose of the KillaJoule is what I call eco-activism in disguise. We want to change general public opinion about electric vehicles and particularly changing the image that they’re slow… by building something that is so fast that nobody can ignore it.”

And this is where 3D printing enters, making things a lot faster in a new world of manufacturing.

Ms Håkansson used a LulzBot TAZ 3D printer, and has manufactured an increasing amount of components for KillaJoule.

“It’s opened a whole new dimension of manufacturing,” Ms Håkansson says. “You can do things you can’t even dream of making otherwise.”

Using PLA filament, in keeping with her environment-friendly vision since its biodegradable, she has designed key elements such as spoilers and leading edges for her bike. Other elements in her project use different materials, such as the speedometer housing which uses INOVA-1800, premium material.

“If you compare to what it costs to have parts made or the time you would spend machining something similar or building it with using other methods, 3D printed parts are super cheap,” reflected Ms Håkansson. “You can have maybe a 24-hour print, but you don’t have to watch it for 24 hours. You just load it and then you go and do something else, so we consider the machine time almost free.”

Projects such as KillaJoule prove that 3D printing is allowing more complex according to 3Dprintingindustry.com and ‘ambitious projects to be built in a faster and more financially accessible fashion. 3D printing technology shows a promising future for the motorcycle and automotive industries, and perhaps more interestingly, it allows for the inclusion of amateurs, without the backing of a vast team of mechanics, into new fields’.

Ms Håkansson just loves building and racing things that have never been built before, and that’s the way it has always been. You could say that it’s in the genes. Growing up in her native Sweden, her dad built and raced motorcycles in evenings and weekends, her mum was his mechanic, and a young Eva went to the racetrack in the baby carrier.

“My father Sven was an engineer and champion motorcycle rider who laid the foundation for my love of science and motorcycles,” she says. “I basically grew up in his machine shop, and he has always encouraged me to get my hands dirty. He insisted that I worked on my own car and motorcycle, and we converted a motorcycle into electric in 2007. That was the starting point for my love of electric vehicles.”

Being able to build a vehicle that reaches such speed with a small team and limited equipment is the type of feat that attracts the right type of attention. As 3D printing continues to evolve, the doubt is rapidly disappearing into the rear view mirror.

The post 3D Printing helps makes the world’s fastest female rider appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

Genie extends its Super Boom family

Genie continues to expand its Super Boom family with the announcement of the arrival of the new SX-150 telescopic boom lift.

Genie continues to expand its Super Boom family with the announcement of the arrival of the new SX-150 telescopic boom lift.

Genie continues to expand its Super Boom family with the announcement of the arrival of the new SX-150 telescopic boom lift.

The new model follows on from the success of the Genie SX180 (in stock and for hire from companies such as Rich Rigging) and provides another option to complement the Super Boom product range.

New Zealand distributor for Genie, Youngman Richardson & Co Ltd says that the new model will be available later this year.

Described as offering uncompromising productivity, reliability and serviceability the Genie SX150 provides industry-leading capacity in a full working envelope.

“It’s the cost effective choice when it comes to tackling the most challenging of environments such as construction, maintenance, telecommunications and other large utility applications,” according to Youngman Richardson & Co.

With excellent productivity benefits, the SX150 boom lift reaches its full platform height of 46 metres in less than three minutes. The SX150 offers four programmable height settings and a horizontal and vertical rotating jib allows for quick repositioning of the platform.

The boom lift also provides unrestricted range of motion with a lift capacity of 340kg for a

maximum of two people.

The new Genie SX150 telescopic boom uses an identical, field-proven chassis design as employed on the SX180 and ZX135 boom lifts. External sensors and manifolds are protected under steel covers that are easily removed providing excellent service access. Genie products are known for their serviceability and the SX150 boom lift is no exception.

All manifolds offer easy wrench access by way of a swing out tray and the boom features simple to reach hydraulics with a drop in return filter for easy cleaning and replacement.

“Overall the new Genie offers a great package that maintains the quality and integrity that you come to expect from a Genie product.”

This same standard also flows through into its full range of telescopic and articulating booms.

For more information on the new Genie SX150 telescopic boom lift contact:
Youngman Richardson & Co Ltd
09 443 2436.

The post Genie extends its Super Boom family appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

WHAT ENGINEERS NEED TO KNOW: ASSET MANAGEMENT

In the 1980’s Dr Steve Boshoff was designing attack helicopter weapon systems, followed by tools and systems for maintaining nuclear power reactors.

In the 1980’s Dr Steve Boshoff was designing attack helicopter weapon systems, followed by tools and systems for maintaining nuclear power reactors.

In the 1980’s Dr Steve Boshoff was designing attack helicopter weapon systems, followed by tools and systems for maintaining nuclear power reactors. He has used this experience to develop a thorough knowledge of maintenance systems, reliability and managing assets to achieve the greatest return.

Dr Boshoff is one of the guest speakers at the 2016 National Maintenance Engineering Conference in Hamiltion.

He will give a high-impact no-frills introduction to asset management and how it affects us all. What is it? How does it change business thinking? What do Engineers need to know about it?

The ‘Engineers Introduction to Asset Management’ exposes engineers to the international asset management standard, PAS 55. The present understanding of asset management is challenged and the brief presentation is intended to show the differences in thinking about asset management.

An engineer’s day-to-day focus has traditionally been to keep the plant going. That is, we keep the pumps, valves, electrical system, etc, all working. If it breaks down, we fix it. The pressures of maintaining production hover over our heads and rightly so. So every day is about ‘fixing’ the asset.

Some will argue that we don’t only do reactive maintenance but that we also do preventive maintenance and some companies even do predictive maintenance. We use all the fancy tools for vibration analyses, thermography, acoustics, reliability centred maintenance (REM) and many more; the things engineers like to play with and we wonder why we are still faced with the challenges of increasing operating and maintenance costs, customer pressures, and maintenance budget cuts.

It’s because we are taking a micro look at the maintenance of the assets. For engineers, generally, assets are about the bits and pieces; the equipment that makes up the plant. Typically, the pumps, valves and all other types of assets. But by looking at each one individually or even as a subsystem of the plant still doesn’t give us the control of the plant.

Without getting into too much detail, lets agree that we need to take a more holistic view of our work – a macro view

PAS 55 is an international asset management standard that provides the guidelines to do exactly that. Essentially, the macro view of asset management is the consolidated business process to ensure that the physical assets will deliver the intended demand capability and return on investment required by the business’ operations – both now and into the future.

The post WHAT ENGINEERS NEED TO KNOW: ASSET MANAGEMENT appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

SLASHERTECK FOR THE CUTTING EDGE

An Australian innovation is about to enter world markets to automate the hazardous, costly and never-ending task of slashing roadside grass.

An Australian innovation is about to enter world markets to automate the hazardous, costly and never-ending task of slashing roadside grass.

An Australian innovation is about to enter world markets to automate the hazardous, costly and never-ending task of slashing roadside grass around millions of poles, fences, safety barriers and signposts lining highways and byways.

Instead of whole teams of roadside workers laboriously manually trimming vegetation around the multitude of safety fence poles and advisory signs involved, the new SlasherTeck innovation uses one man on a tractor to do the job in a fraction of the time. It is also environmentally harmonious, because it drastically reduces the need for chemical spraying of grass and instead delivers a recyclable mulch.

“Not only does this make roadside work safer, but also cuts out a huge part of the hazard for passing traffic that currently has to suddenly slow down for men at work. The job is done much sooner and the hazard is removed much quicker,” says Nathan Boyle of SlasherTeck, which is marketing the machine throughout Australia during the first stage of its world launch.

The patented secret of the SlasherTeck innovation is a rotating triple-bladed mulching unit that can slash around posts. The strong and durable unit, incorporating a single slot to accommodate posts of different sizes, works by being located with a post at its centre and then rotated completely around the post using a hydraulically driven motor and 12 mulching blades.

“The slasher cuts the rest of the verge as per normal, then once it approaches a post, the operator engages the post-slashing process, which rotates the blades a full 180 degrees in approximately 10 seconds,” says Mr Boyle.

The clever cutter, linked with the recently patented slasher operation and asset management system (SOAMS) has the ability to remember the work it has done, using GPS and Cloud-based technology, so that when the grass grows back it knows where the posts are on a particular stretch of road and can repeat the job it did previously. This asset management programme saves further time and cost and further enhances road safety.

SlasherTeck’s innovation is the result of some radically different thinking from its developers Down Under, a consortium of practical-minded businessmen, manufacturing from the Hunter Valley region of NSW.

In their search for a better way to do the job, as requested by local authorities and governments, they turned conventional thinking inside out: instead of their machine nibbling at the verges from the outside edges towards the centre of the post, they placed the post at the centre of the cutting action and revolved the cutters around the axis of the post.

“It is literally a revolutionary approach,” says consortium member Tom Woods, who with his brother Glenn directs TW Woods Construction, a national metal engineering company which has transformed the SlasherTeck from concept to manufactured reality.

The SlasherTeck Consortium – including New Holland tractors and McConnel equipment – has conducted extensive trials to ensure the concept works before stepping out into national and world markets. The new machine is built to the same virtually bulletproof standards that go into TW Woods’ giant multi-storey train loaders and coal materials handling equipment that the company produces for world leaders in the demanding resources sector.

“We make all our products tough because our markets demand the reliability and credibility of world-class producers. Local and State authorities also deal in big projects and large asset bases where time is money, so they need to know the product is as tough as they come,” says Mr Woods.

Asset management

SlasherTeck products seamlessly integrate with their own asset management system, slasher operation and asset management system (SOAMS), a GPS based operation and asset management system that has been designed to accumulate valuable data from each maintenance run.

SOAMS uses a combination of the slasher location, point of engagement, some additional hardware and a custom-built cloud-based app to provide a work-as-executed profile and asset location, type and condition data set.

Components

Reach arm mower head: For long strips of roadside barriers, SlasherTeck has a reach arm mower head that attaches onto a reach arm for the clearing of vegetation around and underneath the barriers, which can stretch on for kilometres at a time. The cutting width is 900mm and the slasher head has three sets of cutting and mulching blades that are driven by high quality hydraulic motors.

Front mounted slasher: The front-mounted slasher is the workhorse of the line-up, comprising of two models with cutting widths of 1200 and 1800mm. This slasher is primarily used for the majority of accessible applications with the ability to clear the vegetation around posts in the same pass. This slasher has three sets of cutting and mulching blades that are driven by high quality hydraulic motors.

Side shift tilt hitch: This unit maximises the effectiveness of the Front Mounted Slasher. It is positioned between the tractor and the Front Mounted Slasher and allows the slasher to be shifted up to 900mm to the off-side and rotates up to a 15 degree angle to meet the ground profile.

The post SLASHERTECK FOR THE CUTTING EDGE appeared first on NZ Engineering News.

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